Mother’s Day

People have asked me what the motivation was behind starting Vort Port International (VPI). There were a number of factors including past experiences and lessons learned from working on philanthropic projects that lacked elements of social and financial sustainability. One instance, a team of people had designed and fundraised for an orphan care center in Malawi, but the work was not maintained due to lack of training and education of the members of the community. It taught me that connecting with the community and teaching them useful skills was crucial to the long-term success of the project. Lessons like that help shape how VPI currently makes decisions. And, underlying all that, the creation of VPI may stem from my experience of being part of a home that was given a chance to grow.

The majority of my early childhood was spent living in low-income, government-subsidized housing in Michigan. I remember eating free school lunches, receiving grocery bags of staple consumer goods, dumpster-diving for any furniture we could find, going to my mother’s workplace because we could not afford a babysitter. My mother, Yuyang Ye, would wake up before the sun and commute to work, and she would stay up until two o’clock in the morning to study, translating her biology textbook from English to Chinese word by word.

Merry with her brother and Mom, 1988.

I recall these things and, above all else, I was happy and immensely loved. Life was focused on family, appreciation for having one another, and simple daily necessities. My mother would always say that the value of a person is not in what they own but in who they are. We did our best to make it by, while trying to live virtuously. In times of need, though, a strong network of people offered to us what we could not provide for ourselves. Free after-school programming at the local community center offered a babysitting service to allow my mother to work more hours. English as a Second Language tutored me in English, something my mother had not yet mastered. Family friends would generously take my brother and I to museums to help enrich our young minds, revealing an entire world to explore. Libraries offered a second home to further nurture our curiosity. Summer camps at the YMCA engaged children in team sports and taught us a strong appreciation for the outdoors.

I look back on a childhood full of wonders and excitement, and I have both my mother and my community to thank. Through perseverance and determination, my mother finished her Master’s degree and our family made its way into the middle-class. The support that my family received allowed us to succeed and, as a result, I strive to provide similar opportunities for others in need.

A realization grew within me as I began traveling more. When I visited Madagascar there were families content with what little they had, living simply and within their means. I realized that people, regardless of background, all want the same thing — parents want to provide for their children, children work hard to carry on legacies, and communities work together to help one another. The majority of families share a willingness to work hard and learn new things, if given the chance. Most of the world’s people are relegated to lifestyles less prone to meaningful opportunity. By providing community outlets to learn new skills they otherwise may not have a chance to learn, the less fortunate can make their lives infinitely better. And perhaps this engendered sense of greater giving will be paid forward time and time again. These personal beliefs inspired the creation of VPI, and they continue to be the centerfold of the work that we do. VPI empowers community members to provide for themselves a sustainable lifestyle, by teaching them important skills for long-term success. VPI functions by a group of young professionals who care deeply about bringing out the best in the people through smart, sustainable technologies and programs. And we understand that our contribution does not stop at the individuals we help; we’re passing on lifelong skills that can change entire communities for the better. And when their children grow older, they can continue to better the world one generation at a time.

Malagasy mother with her baby. Visit to Madagascar, 2010.

When speaking with VPI colleagues, many of them come from similar backgrounds. Their families and communities influenced their decision to become a global citizen and contribute to something beyond themselves. We would like to recognize Mother’s day, just last Sunday, and honor the love and dedication that our mothers have provided us throughout the years. Thank you for being there for us, always giving your support every step of the way. It was you and the many chances that we were offered that allowed us to grow into the people we are today.

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One response to “Mother’s Day”

  1. Pops says :

    … couldn’t make it through the post without my eyes filling up, Mer. A beautiful mom and a beautiful daughter, in every way.

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